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Archive for April, 2005

Names

Posted in Uncategorized on April 29th, 2005 by darcusb – Comments Off

As I’m getting closer to announcing the stuff I’ve been working on, I need feedback/ideas on names.

Right now, I have the following working names:

  1. project name: XBiblio
  2. citation markup schema (what will be added to OpenOffice, but also standalone): XML Citation Schema (XCS)
  3. citation style language: Citation Style Language (CSL)
  4. formatting processor: CiteProc

I like XBiblio fine, though someone parked the domain name as soon as I registered it at Sourcefoge. With respect to XBiblio and CiteProc, I’ve run into two issues. First, people confuse the two. Second, it’s not clear how to pronounce CiteProc.

I’m not good with names. Any better ideas? Simple, clear, and catchy would be nice.

I suppose I could just call the project and the processor XBib, though the virtue of CiteProc is it has no reference to XML. Indeed, I could imagine someone rewriting it in another language; and so could imagine citeproc-py, citeproc-rb, etc.).

Typo 2

Posted in Uncategorized on April 24th, 2005 by darcusb – Comments Off

A new release of the nice-looking new Ruby Rails weblog engine Typo.

I’m still hoping for more widespread implementations that blur the weblog and wiki application; something like the Java-based SnipSnap. Am still thinking about my idea for a BibBliki.

Clientside XSLT and Feeds

Posted in Uncategorized on April 23rd, 2005 by darcusb – 3 Comments

Here is a clever use of RSS/Atom feeds + xslt. Open it in a browser that supports client-side XSLT (Firefox, Safari 1.3, etc.), and you get a beautifully rendered web page. Open it in a feed reading application, and you get a list of photographs with descriptions and links. And it’s the same source!

This is exactly the sort of thing I’d like see with Atom and bibliographic metadata and annotations. When I get some time, I need to come up with a demo.

Direct Manipulation on the Web

Posted in Uncategorized on April 15th, 2005 by darcusb – Comments Off

At some point I have in mind creating an online repository and editing interface for my CSL files. I know it’d require some Javascript magic, but I wasn’t exactly sure how it’d work, since I’d never seen the kind of direct manipulation interface I’d wanted. I want users to be able to drag-and-drop and reorder metadata fields, and within them be able to enter formatting details like punctuation.

Well, here’s exactly what I was looking for. Nice stuff! [from the Ajaxian weblog]

RLI vs. Atom

Posted in Uncategorized on April 15th, 2005 by darcusb – Comments Off

I’ve been talking with some people at Oxford University who are doing some work with the IMS Resource List Interoperability. From the main page:

The Resource List Interoperability (RLI) specification details how structured meta-data can be exchanged between systems that store and expose resources for the purpose of creating resource lists and those that gather and organize those Resource Lists for educational or training purposes. A typical example of such a resource list is a reading list.

I confess, I really don’t understand the need for this sort of spec. It’s horribly complex, for what benefit? Rather than reuse existing bibliographic metadata specs like MODS, it defines that as well. I see virtually no chance that any of the sort of hackers who do a lot of the innovation on the web are ever likely to look at it seriously.

Meanwhile, there is Atom, which is described like so in the spec:

Atom is an XML-based document format that describes lists of related information known as “feeds”. Feeds are composed of a number of items, known as “entries”, each with an extensible set of attached metadata. For example, each entry has a title.

Maybe I’m missing somethiing, but it seems to me to serve the same broad purpose as RLI. Atom has some of the smartest people in the world of web and xml rechnologies working on it, and it shows. The spec is simple and flexible, and will be far more widely deployed than any IMS spec will ever be. Indeed, Mozilla already supports Atom, and IIRC Safari will soon too. So an instructor could construct a course reading list for her students, and they could access it directly in their browsers. Likewise for scholars collaborating on a research project.

So why do I want to use a reading list format that only a narrow range of applications will ever read?